Footballers arrested

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Cinneide
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Footballers arrested

Post by Cinneide » Sun Feb 08, 2009 8:58 am

On 18 October 1938 Peter McKennan of Partick Thistle was arrested at Rugby Park after an incident with Freddy Milloy. McKennan was eventually found guilty of assaulting Milloy in the tunnel after a game in which McKennan felt the referee hadn't protected him from Milloy's challenges. McKennan was convicted of finding his own justice after the game. (I may have some of the details wrong - I don't have my notes in front of me).

Are there many examples of footballers facing legal action for actions on or around the pitch?

I can think immediately of Duncan Ferguson and the incident involving McAvennie, Butcher, Roberts and Woods.

Any/many more?

David - is this incident well known in Kilmarnock circles? It wasn't one I had come across until stuthejag discovered it.
[url=http://www.PTEarlyYears.net/]Partick Thistle - The Early Years - A Club History Online[/url]

Scottish
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Post by Scottish » Sun Feb 08, 2009 11:14 am

Stuthejag pm'd me about this just before the end of last year when he was researching it for an article in the Thistle programme. I replied:

"I wrote about this on my chapter on Freddie Milloy in the book 'Killie Greats.'

During the game Milloy was booked for a foul on McKennan. They came to blows after the game and McKennan was charged. At Kilmarnock Sheriff Court Milloy was called as witness. In his defence McKennan said Milloy looked in a fighting mood after the match and that he only acted in retaliation after being struck on the chin.

Milloy admitted the foul and the booking but denied striking or attempting to strike McKennan after the match. Some charges like breach of the peace were dropped but McKennan was convicted, as you'll know from the press reports, of "striking him on the face with his fist" and was fined £5 or 30 days. The SFA suspended both players for fourteen days and fined McKennan £20 and Milloy £5. They also rebuked KFC and "strongly deprecated" the police involvement, saying they could have dealt with the matter themselves.

I calculated the fines to be £800 and £160 in modern day money. Certainly not a slap on the wrist for part-time players. The suspensions were worse than the usual as well. 14 days normally meant two games but given the SFA hearing was on Dec 21st both players missed four matches over the Xmas/New Year period.

At the same hearing a Vale of Atholl player was suspended for a year! "


Yes, it was a well-known incident, causing quite a stir at the time both locally and in the press.

A few seasons earlier Alex Massie of Hearts was arrested after Killie's 2-0 home win on November 19th 1935, charged with assaulting a spectator. He was accused of throwing mud at a 19-year-old Kilmarnock fan. The Killie boss Hugh Spence was called as a witness and questioned about the state of the pitch. Hearts goalkeeper, the legendary Jack Harkness, also took the stand where he said it was common practice for players to divest themselves of mud at the end of a game and that he was certain this was what his team-mat had been doing.

Massie was found not guilty.

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Post by Hampden Diehard » Tue Feb 24, 2009 11:09 pm

My father knew Ma Ba McKennan and he told him a story about when he was at Middlesbrough. I think it concerned the English international Wilf Mannion, who was said to be absolutely full of himself. Mannion thought that he was the top paid player at the club, but Peter knew that it was himself who was best paid. Anyway, Mannion really got on his nerves with his self-importanace until Peter could take it no longer. He said, "You think you're the best paid player at this club, but you're wrong, it's me. But I won't be this week!" and he whacked Mannion in the face.

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Post by Scottish » Wed Feb 25, 2009 12:13 am

I can well believe the story but I have difficulty in accepting it was Wilf Mannion who was on the other end of Big Peter's fist. Mannion was one of the most modest of men. He kept only one trophy on display in his home and that was from the Priory Social Club in Middlesbrough! No one who met him ever had a bad word to say about him and that was rare enough for footballers of his vintage let alone now.

Mannion didn't even receive a testimonial until he was 65 and even then it was a joint one with George Hardwick. As for money, well the maximum wage was in force in those days and when Mannion was 36 years old he still faced a long hard struggle to get Middlesbrough to release him so that he could have one final season and his first ever signing-on fee when he moved to Hull.

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