Football club in Glasgow 1865

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ScottishFA
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Football club in Glasgow 1865

Post by ScottishFA » Tue Feb 17, 2009 1:06 pm

Just came across an advert in the Glasgow Herald for Friday 24 November 1865:

ST. ANDREW FOOTBALL CLUB - A match will be played on Saturday first, on the Queen's Park, Great Western Road, at two p.m. Members are requested to be present.


Has anyone heard of them before? If they were a rugby club, perhaps this is not so exciting, but if they played to association rules, they pre-date QP by a couple of years.

LEATHERSTOCKING
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Post by LEATHERSTOCKING » Tue Feb 17, 2009 5:27 pm

Edinburgh Academicals Football Club & Edinburgh University Football Club were both formed in 1857, West of Scotland in 1865 & Royal High School in 1867 and Edinburgh Wanderers 1867. Exact dates for Glasgow Academical, Merchistonians & St.Andrews University are all shrouded in doubt but they were all playing in 1867. A Stranraer Football Club started up in 1865 but had gone within a few years at most. WofS MUST have had someone to play in the Glasgow area and there is no reason why St.Andrew Football Club wasn`t one of them. Clubs of very short history don`t tend to have much in the way of written record & history is normally written by the winners so the weak get obliterated or the truth is bent a little. I guess St.Andrew FC would have played whatever game they could because in the mid 60s it was only beginning to evolve into dribbling or handling and the difference wasn`t sufficiently great to prevent transfer of codes. There is no record but I`m still sure Queen`s Park played games vs. the likes of WofS. It would be strange if West`s game was so isolated from QP`s that the two groups of young men could share the same offices, shops and manufacturies, the same housing and interest in ball games & NOT got together on the field. West leased their ground to Queen`s for the 1872 International vs. England - out of the blue? I think not. The difference between the two codes only became accentuated laterly but at the time they were all FOOTBALL CLUBS. St.Andrew FC is a welcome "new" addition.

"QUEEN`S PARK, GREAT WESTERN ROAD" was an area on the North side of Great Western Road roughly east from Napiershall Street stretching to St.George`s Cross and northward to Garscube Road @ Queen`s Cross. It was orginally feud in the 1870s with a view to it becoming home to the better classes of merchants, professionals etc. but it "failed" & became tenement land while the land on both sides of the Great Western Road westward DID become the reserve of the seriously wealthy.

soccerhistory
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Post by soccerhistory » Wed Feb 18, 2009 12:03 pm

To add to Leatherstocking's answer, its also worth noting that many of the early football clubs (pre-1870) not only played under their own rules, but were only formed to allow their members to engage in athletic pursuits. Some of these clubs only ever arranged matches which involved their own membership and did not seek matches with other clubs. This is why the emergence of the various regional associations (London/FA, Sheffield & Scotland) was important in the spread of the game and inter-club & competitive fixtures. It enabled clubs to compete against each other on an equal basis; before this clubs might play to the home team's rules or even change rules at half time during a match.

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Post by LEATHERSTOCKING » Wed Feb 18, 2009 6:18 pm

The earliest game played by West of Scotland Football Club against another club appears to be vs. Edinburgh Academicals FC @ Hamilton Crescent on 15th November 1867 so they must have played inter member matches for two years. Queen`s Park formed in July 1867 and didn`t play THEIR first "outsiders" until 1st August 1868 - a 2-0 win on the Queen`s Park Recreation Ground(1st Hampden). Robert Gardner`s letter to the Thistle secretary accepting the invitation to play this game is on view in the museum @ Hampden and is believed to be the oldest football correspondence in the World. That the game was very little different from that being played on the other side of the Clyde in Partick (neither the QP Rec. nor Hamilton Crescent were actually in Glasgow at this time - English record books insisting the 1872 International was played in Glasgow are wrong. Likewise, 1st & 2nd Hampdens weren`t in Glasgow either until 1891.) by West is evident in the composition of the early Queen`s sides & of their opponents and the scoring - anything from 10 to 16 a side and Queen`s beating Hamilton Gymnasium by 4 goals & nine touchdowns to nil in May 1869.

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