Fife Cup Final, 1968

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Gordon Baird
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Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Gordon Baird » Wed Apr 09, 2014 8:20 am

This is a question for fans of Raith Rovers and East Fife.
Can any of you recall two Dunfermline players, perhaps Lunn and Thomson, parading the Scottish Cup around Stark's Park during half-time of the second leg on 4 May?

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Scottish » Thu Apr 10, 2014 11:15 am

Not saying it didn't happen but I wonder how well it would have gone down with fans of those two clubs. That said, I recall Celtic bringing the Scottish Cup to Rugby Park in 1971 and parading it round the pitch. That though was a testimonial match for Frank Beattie, non-competitive and with the cup-winning side one of the participants.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Gordon Baird » Thu Apr 10, 2014 11:53 am

Someone who was taken to the game as a youngster remembers it happening and is looking for confirmation of the players involved. He said that they 'received a great ovation but unfortunately attitudes have changed since then'. True enough.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Scottish » Thu Apr 10, 2014 12:23 pm

Gordon Baird wrote:He said that they 'received a great ovation but unfortunately attitudes have changed since then'. True enough.
Hmmmm. I was at the Ayrshire Cup Final in 1965, two days after Killie won the league title, and the championship trophy was paraded around the pitch. Maybe it's because it was so long ago but I don't recall any warm welcome from Ayr fans. I think it's safe to say that had Ayr won a major trophy (stop giggling at the back) and tried to parade it round Rugby Park, anyone expecting applause would have been in for a rude awakening. It was bad enough whenever they did a victory lap with the Ayrshire Cup, let alone something more substantial.

Maybe Fifers are more generous.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Rob R » Thu Apr 10, 2014 1:19 pm

Without going through my records, books and programmes as they are still packed away, Glenrothes reached the Junior Cup Final round about then, but I cant remember if they won it or not.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Gordon Baird » Thu Apr 10, 2014 1:26 pm

Fifers and generous - there are two words you don't often see together.

Glenrothes lost that season's Junior Cup Final after a replay - they won it in 1975.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Scottish » Thu Apr 10, 2014 11:59 pm

Gordon Baird wrote:Fifers and generous - there are two words you don't often see together.
You do when they're being compared to Aberdonians.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by cowdenbeather » Fri Oct 03, 2014 9:21 pm

Have found out the story behind this. It was the second leg of the Fife Cup final between RR and EF at Stark's Park on 4th May 1968. Dunfermline's two Scottish Cup final scorers (and ex Raith players) Pat Gardner and Ian Lister paraded the Scottish Cup before the game and also on show was Raith's Gordon Wallace's trophy which he had just received as the Scottish Football Writers Player of the Year.

I am just in course of completing a booklet covering the whole history of the Fife Cup which I expect to publish before Christmas.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Scottish » Sat Oct 04, 2014 11:58 am

Please post any details in the book section as soon as you have them. Looking forward to it.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by HibeeJibee » Sat Oct 04, 2014 6:43 pm

Agreed, Fife Cup publication would be fantastic.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Gordon Baird » Mon Oct 06, 2014 7:20 am

Thanks for the information. I'll pass it on to the gentleman who made the enquiry, if I can remember who it was. His memory is clearly better than mine.

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Snuff » Mon Oct 06, 2014 9:11 am

Fife being a foreign country to me, I hadn't been paying much attention to this thread, prior to reading it this morning.

I noticed Scottish's mention of the Ayrshire Cup Final of 1965, at Rugby Park. This was, as David rightly mentioned, held in the midweek after that wonderful Killie win at Tynecastle, which secured the league title. Will it really be 50-years ago this coming April?

Davie Paterson, who scored Ayr's goal in a 1-0 win that night at Rugby Park (or so he claims); also claims that he still gets the odd pint bought for him in Ayr, on the strength of that goal.

I notice that game, or indeed any Ayrshire Cup game, is missing from Scottish's otherwise excellent Kilmarnock history 'Every Game'. A strange oversight.
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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Scottish » Mon Oct 06, 2014 11:32 am

Snuff wrote:
I notice that game, or indeed any Ayrshire Cup game, is missing from Scottish's otherwise excellent Kilmarnock history 'Every Game'. A strange oversight.
That match in particular does get a mention (two entire sentences and seven whole lines) in my earlier "Killie - The Official History." It doesn't feature in "Everygame" because of the club-by-club approach of that book as opposed to the season-by-season of the former. In the first book it was impossible (tempting though it was) to omit it as it was the same evening that Killie paraded the League Championship trophy around Rugby Park. Not to mention the opposition or the result would have been a bit like those old Soviet photos in which Stalin had obliterated every trace of Trotsky.

The match itself was between the top team in Scotland and the second bottom and should have been a foregone conclusion. IIRC the two chief talking points on the bus to the match were about the title win (naturally) and whether the game itself would see Killie record a double-figure victory!

It was played on Monday April 26th 1965, just a little over 48 hours following the title win, and the theory expounded in my book is that perhaps the effects of the celebratory shandies were still being felt.

Two other items of note. It was a typical Spring evening in Ayrshire - in other words a monsoon - and this affected the size of the crowd. However, even taking that into account and also the thousands who travelled to Edinburgh two days previously and were satisfied enough with seeing the title won, the crowd of 5,673 was disappointing. For a small boy though it meant it was easier to see the trophy paraded.

In later years of course the number claiming to have been at Tynecastle grew to reach that of Sevillian proportions.

For the Ayrshire Cup itself there is the occasional mention in "Everygame" in entries for former senior sides in Ayrshire. In the earlier book I devote a fair amount of space to the competition in its heyday prior to the advent of league football.

If you haven't already got it then I would recommend a copy of the programme for the 1992 final at Rugby Park on April 22nd that year. Although much smaller than usual (twelve pages) there's a potted history, list of winners, a feature on 19th century Killie star "Jebb" Wark, photos of medals and a history of Killie v Ayr clashes, including dates and results.

Oddly enough, although the result appears alongside all the others, there's no mention of the 1965 match anywhere else in the programme!

This was, I think, the first season with Richard Cairns at the helm and he and John Livingston revolutionised the match programmes with a much greater emphasis on club history.

Another interesting match programme is that for the second leg, at Rugby Park, on May 1st 1971. This was claimed to be the first match in Scotland to be decided on penalty kicks, even though Airdrie had beaten Nottingham Forest by the same method on September 28th 1970 in the Texaco Cup. Perhaps it was the first ALL-SCOTTISH match to be decided that way.

There's a potted Ayrshire Cup history there which looks like a cut-and-paste job from Hugh Taylor's "Go Fame..." centenary history.

Close season events at the Killie Club mentioned in this programme are also interesting. The acts lined up are certainly "big name" for the day even if most of them were long past their peak of popularity. But the headline "Swinging Summer Season At The Killie Club" may suggest something other than what was actually on offer. As would the promise to have "a gay summer touch."

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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Snuff » Mon Oct 06, 2014 4:19 pm

Well - that's me telt. Thanks David.

I note your mention of Hughie Taylor, a man who was a terrific encouragement to me in my efforts to make my way in sports journalism. I owe Hughie, Harry Reid, "Dan" Archer and "Stop Press" (Bill Aitken) of the Cumnock Chronicle a great deal.

My late father was always sceptical about my sports-writing career, until the day I showed him a two page spread from the Sunday Standard. I had one of the page leads, other writers featured were "Dan", Norman Mair, Ian St John, Doug Gillon and Hughie.

Dad said: "Aye well, if your stuff's on the same page as Hugh Taylor's, you must be doing something right".
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Re: Fife Cup Final, 1968

Post by Scottish » Mon Oct 06, 2014 8:11 pm

Snuff wrote: Dad said: "Aye well, if your stuff's on the same page as Hugh Taylor's, you must be doing something right".
Must have been a proud moment for both of you.

Hughie started out on the long-defunct Kilmarnock Herald back in the early 1930s. At one time his battered old portable typewriter held pride of place in the Scottish Football Museum alongside Archie MacPherson's sheepskin and some seats from the Hampden press box as part of an exhibition of the Scottish sporting media.

I remember, along with many other schoolboys, waiting in anticipation for the publication of "Go Fame..." - price 6/- (30p). Years later when researching the 125 book (and my father felt much the same as yours, here was his son following on from Hugh Taylor 25 years previously), I came across some notes of Hughie's suggesting who was to get free copies and who was to get copies for review. Amongst the latter was another son of Kilmarnock, Hugh McIlvanney. Even then, back in 1969, McIlvanney was one of the most famous sportswriters in the country, at that time being, I think, chief sports correspondent for The Observer

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