Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

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Carlucci
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Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by Carlucci » Wed Feb 07, 2007 12:14 pm

Can anyone tell me about Wallace & Ally McLeod's career as football players & managers. As players, I just know that Wallace was goalkeeper, because I've seen some pictures from him playing for Airdrieonians, and Ally McLeod played for Third Lanark. Which clubs did he play for? When did they made their debuts in the Scottish League & their last game? I'm not sure, but was Jock Wallace the manager in charge when Berwick Rangers shocked the world by defeating Rangers 1-0 in the Scottish Cup in 1967? Tell us everything you think it may be worth interesting, please. Thanks & Cheers.

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Post by Scottish » Wed Feb 07, 2007 7:19 pm

John Martin Bokas Wallace (and both John Litster’s disk on players in Scotland and Barry Hugman’s books on players in England confirm that was his full name – no wonder he was just known as Jock throughout his career) was born in Wallyford, East Lothian on September 6th 1935. He was originally signed on amateur forms by Blackpool but turned semi-professional at 17 with Workington Town then in the English Third Division (North). He made six league appearances there (and also worked as a coal miner) before moving to Berwick Rangers in September 1954 (Wallace was in the King’s Own Scottish Borderers doing his National Service and based in Berwick-upon-Tweed). Berwick were then in the C Division and I have no details for games played in 1954-55 but he didn’t make any first team appearances in the B Division in 1955-56. (Berwick were one of five clubs admitted to that division when the C Division was abolished in 1955.

He made his Scottish League debut for Berwick in what was now renamed the Second Division in 1956-57, playing seven times. He played a similar number of games in 1957-58 plus three League Cup matches before being transferred to First Division Airdrieonians where he played 14 league games.

In 1958-59 he was an ever-present for Airdrie, making 41 first team appearances (34 league, six League Cup & one in the Scottish Cup. Despite conceding 87 goals in total (62 league, 18 League Cup, 7 Scottish Cup) Airdrie finished 5th in the table and (according to Litster) Wallace was selected to play for the Scottish League against a Scotland XI in an international trial game. This was his only representative honour.

After a further ten appearances in 1959-60 (six league, four League Cup) Wallace tried his luck south of the border again, this time with West Bromwich Albion, then in the First Division. He played 30 league matches for the Baggies team which finished 4th that season. He made 22 appearances the following season and 17 in 1961-62 and also played in seven FA Cup ties before leaving The Hawthorns when he lost his place to Tony Millington who was preferred by new manager Archie Macaulay. Perhaps surprisingly (he was still only 26) his next port of call was non-league Bedford Town. He also played for non-league Hereford United before joining Berwick as player-coach in December 1966.

Perhaps someone can help out here. Bedford were responsible for one of the biggest FA Cup shocks ever when they beat 2nd Division Newcastle United 2-1 in the third round at St James Park in January 1964. They also reached the fourth round in 1966 beating Hereford in the third round. Before that Hereford had knocked out 2nd Division Millwall. If Wallace played in any of these games it would establish a pre-Berwick giant-killing pedigree.

Wallace holds the distinction of being the only man to play in the English, Welsh & Scottish Cups in the same season (unless someone knows differently) by turning out in all three competitions in 1966-67. He was the goalkeeper/manager of the team that created the biggest upset ever in the Scottish Cup when the ‘wee’ Rangers beat the ‘big’ Rangers 1-0 in January 1967. He made 21 league and four Scottish Cup appearances that term. In 1967-68 he played four times in both League Cup and Scottish Cup as well as 31 times in the league. His final season as a player was in 1968-69 when he made 23 league appearances, six League Cup appearances and turned out twice in the Scottish Cup before joining Hearts as a coach under manager John Harvey. In 1970 he took up a similar position at Rangers under Willie Waddell. After Rangers won the European Cup Winners Cup in 1972 Waddell became general manager and Wallace took over as first team manager in his own right. Rangers won the Scottish Cup for the first time in seven years in his first season in charge in 1973 (they had entered the Cup Winners Cup in 1971-72 as Scottish Cup runners-up). The next season was less successful but in 1974-75 Wallace led Rangers to their first League title in eleven years and – perhaps more importantly in the eyes of some – prevented Celtic from winning a tenth successive championship.

His best days at Ibrox came in 1975-76 and again two seasons later when Rangers won the domestic treble of League, Scottish Cup and League Cup, becoming the first (and so far the only) manager to lead Rangers to two ‘trebles’ (Jock Stein was the first manager to do so, with Celtic in 1967 & 1969).

Disagreements with the club hierarchy led Wallace to take up the managerial reins at Leicester City at the end of 1977-78. Leicester had just been relegated from the top flight but within two seasons Wallace had taken them back up as Second Division Champions. Unfortunately they were relegated after one season and failure to take them back up again led to a parting of the ways. He succeeded Davie Hay at newly-promoted Motherwell and kept them in the Scottish Premier in 1982-83.

He returned to Rangers for a second spell in 1983 but couldn’t repeat the success of his first period. Apart from Celtic, he also had to compete with Aberdeen under Alex Ferguson and Jim McLean’s Dundee United. Latterly, Hearts also emerged as a force to be reckoned with. After three largely unsuccessful seasons (though Rangers did win the League Cup twice) he was replaced by Graeme Souness

He spent an unsuccessful season in Spain with Sevilla in 1986-87 (they finished 14th). In January 1989 he took over at Colchester United who were bottom of the English League. Wallace successfully kept league football at Layer Road but with the team again struggling at the foot of the table in 1989-90 he was dismissed from what turned out to be his last post in management. It was an ill-fitting end to his managerial career.

Wallace began to suffer from Motor Neurone Disease (the same affliction which claimed the lives of Jimmy Johnstone & of ex-England manager Don Revie amongst others) and died in 1996, aged just sixty.

McLeod to follow when time permits.
Last edited by Scottish on Thu Feb 08, 2007 9:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Sat31March1928 » Wed Feb 07, 2007 8:01 pm

There's a marvellous picture of Ally in the early 60's when he was playing for Hibs in a Cardigan at home.

Far better than the head in the hands one from 1978.

I'll see if i can find it.
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Post by Sat31March1928 » Wed Feb 07, 2007 8:03 pm

wee quiz question which other Scottish Cup winning manager was born in Wallyford?
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Post by LEATHERSTOCKING » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:24 pm

A picture of Ally McLeod in a cardigan playing for Hibs in his home is a picture I`m dying to see.

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Post by LEATHERSTOCKING » Wed Feb 07, 2007 9:25 pm

Sorry, let me rephrase that. A picture of Ally McLeod playing for Hibs in a cardigan in his home is a picture I`m dying to see.

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Post by Scottish » Thu Feb 08, 2007 7:53 pm

Ally MacLeod (or Alistair Reid MacLeod to use his full name as on John Litster’s disk) was born in Glasgow on February 26th 1931 and attended Queen’s Park School. He signed for Third Lanark (then in the A Division of the Scottish League) as a schoolboy in 1947 and on professional terms when he left school in June 1949. His first team debut was a league game at home against Stirling Albion on November 6th 1949 – a match Thirds lost 4-2 but which was notable for the stand catching fire at the end of the game. MacLeod – and all the other players and officials – had to make a mad dash to the dressing rooms to grab their clothes before the fire engines arrived.

Ally – who played on the left wing and later in his career at left-half - made 11 league appearances that season and scored two goals. He made no appearances the next season but in 1951-52 took part in 22 of the 30 league games, scoring once. He also made his debuts in both the League Cup (one appearance) and Scottish Cup (seven appearances) and scored a goal in both those competitions. Thirds reached the semi-final of the Scottish Cup that season.

In 1952-53 he played in 21 league games (one goal) and three League Cup ties. Thirds were relegated at the end of the season. John Litster has him as being given a free transfer at the end of the season but has no date for him re-signing and re-sign he must have as he played in all 45 competitive matches for Thirds in 1953-54 - 30 league (seven goals), eight League Cup (three goals) & seven Scottish Cup – including an epic three-game contest v Rangers which Thirds eventually lost. In the first game – watched by Cathkin’s all-time record crowd of 45,591 – Ally missed a golden opportunity to win the game. His failure meant he had to drop out of the Scotland ‘B’ team due to play England ‘B’ the same day as the first replay with Rangers. This was the closest he came to representative honours.

I’ve no direct evidence for this but I suspect the free transfer may have been a ploy by the club to ensure players lost the more advantageous terms they would have agreed to as A Division players. Players would then have re-signed on less money as B Division players.

In 1954-55 he made 28 competitive appearances ( 20 league, four goals, six League Cup, one goal, two Scottish Cup, one goal). The next term saw him leave Cathkin after eight league games & two goals plus five League Cup matches & one goal when he signed for A Division St Mirren. He played 22 times for the Buddies in the league (three goals) and three times in the Scottish Cup. At the end of the season he was transferred south to Blackburn Rovers who had just missed out on promotion, finishing 4th in the Second Division.

Ally played in 41 of the 42 league games (seven goals) in 1956-57 as Rovers again finished 4th, missing promotion by two points. 1957-58 brought him his first playing honour. Rovers were a strong side with Ronnie Clayton, Peter Dobing & Bryan Douglas who all went on to play for England plus Welsh international Roy Vernon and they were also aided by the late arrival of Scottish striker Tommy Johnston. Yet Ally held his own in this illustrious company, scoring 17 goals in 38 league matches – only Dobing scoring more. It was Ally’s late equaliser at Fulham in the penultimate match which kept them in the promotion race. Their final match was at Charlton. Rovers had to win whereas a draw would have taken Charlton up. Rovers won an epic game 4-3 in front of a crowd of 56,345 – the largest for a Second Division match at The Valley – to finish as runner-up to West Ham United.

Ally scored his first FA Cup goal this season too when he notched the winner in the 6th round against Liverpool. Unfortunately Bolton Wanderers beat Rovers in the semi-final.

Ally played in English football’s top flight for the first time in 1958-59, making 40 league appearances and scoring four times as Rovers easily adjusted to life at the top, finishing 10th of the 22 clubs in the division. He scored another FA Cup goal in a 4-2 win over Leyton Orient but Rovers were beaten by local rivals Burnley in the fourth round.

1959-60 was Ally’s best season in England. Not in the league where Rovers slumped to 17th with Ally making 39 appearances and scoring eight goals. But the FA Cup was a different story. Rovers won through to their first (and to date, only) FA Cup Final since 1928. They did it the hard way. Of their four victims on the way to the semi-finals – Sunderland, Blackpool, Tottenham & Burnley – only the match against Tottenham didn’t require a replay. It’s worth noting that Burnley were English champions in 1960 and Spurs won the ‘double’ the following season. Ally scored in the replay win over Sunderland but his best moment was against deadly rivals Burnley in the quarter-finals. Rovers had come back from 3-0 down at Turf Moor to force a replay at Ewood Park. Peter Dobing scored first then Ally netted the goal which secured a 2-0 victory and revenge over their great rivals for the defeat the previous year. A crowd of 74,135 at Maine Road saw Rovers overcome Sheffield Wednesday 2-0 in the semi-finals with both goals coming from their new scoring sensation, Derek Dougan.

In the Final they were up against a Wolves team which missed out on the first 20th century English ‘double’ and a third successive league title by a single point. Ally had a fine game and Rovers were holding their own until four minutes from the interval when Mick McGrath diverted a cross past his own keeper to give Wolves the lead. Two minutes later, Dave Whelan (now owner of Wigan Athletic) broke his leg and in those days before substitutes, Rovers were down to ten men for the entire second half. Despite a superb performance from MacLeod it was asking too much and Wolves ran out 3-0 winners.

Ally MacLeod only took part in two Wembley games in an official capacity – one as a player, the other as a manager. The second was more successful than the first.

Rovers improved to 8th in the league in 1960-61 with Ally scoring 11 times in 38 outings and he scored two more FA Cup goals – in a draw with Bolton. Rovers won the replay and exited the competition in the 5th round. But with the maximum wage now abolished in England Ally felt slighted at not receiving an improved wage offer. By the time Blackburn responded he had agreed to return to Scotland and join Hibernian.

Ally was an ever-present for Hibs in 1961-62, playing in 34 league games (five goals), six League Cup ties (two goals) and two Scottish Cup matches. He also made his debut in Europe, playing four times in the Inter Cities Fairs Cup. Now at the veteran stage of his playing career Ally played just 18 league games (one goal) for the Hibs team which narrowly avoided relegation in 1962-63. He also played a further five Fairs Cup ties. In the close season he left one struggling club for another when he rejoined Third Lanark. He played 24 times in the league (one goal) for Thirds in 1963-64, six League Cup matches (one goal) and four times in the Summer Cup. At the end of that competition he dropped down to the Second Division, signing for Ayr United. His final playing season – 1964-65 – was scarcely memorable as Ayr finished second bottom of the league. Ally played 17 times in the league, six times in the League Cup and once in the Scottish Cup. Although still retained on the playing staff in 1965-66 he made no first team appearances, concentrating instead on coaching as Ayr experienced a remarkable turnaround to win the Second Division title. In May 1966 he took over from Tom McCreath as manager.

His first season in management was a disaster. Ayr won only one league game all season, finishing with just nine points from 34 games and were knocked out of the Scottish Cup by Highland League Elgin City. The easy option would have been to sack the manager. Fortunately for MacLeod – and for Ayr United – they persevered. Ayr finished 5th in the Second Division in 1967-68 and won promotion the following season as runners-up to Motherwell.

MacLeod then embarked on a successful spell as manager keeping the part-time team afloat in the top flight. Highlights along the way included victory over Rangers in front of Somerset Park’s record crowd of 25,225 in 1969-70 and semi-final appearances in both League Cup and Scottish Cup. He also brought through a number of players destined to make their mark with bigger clubs such as David Stewart (Leeds), Dick Malone (Sunderland) ‘Cutty’ Young (Coventry & Rangers) & Johnny Doyle (Celtic) though he was also well-served by club record appearance holder John ‘Spud’ Murphy and striker Alex ‘Dixie’ Ingram.

By the mid-1970s Ayr had progressed from simply struggling to survive in the big time to finishing in the top half and when the Scottish League introduced a ten-club Premier Division in 1975-76, Ayr successfully made the cut.

His Premier association with Ayr was brief though as he took over as manager at Aberdeen in November 1975. His first season was spent fighting off relegation but in 1976-77 Ally really put himself on the map as a manager. Having survived a League Cup scare by being forced to extra time before overcoming Stirling Albion in the quarter-finals, his side lit up Hampden in the semi-finals with a 5-1 demolition of reigning treble-holders Rangers. Aberdeen went on to beat Celtic after extra time in the Final to bring McLeod his first (and as it turned out, only) major trophy success. A naturally ebullient character he seemed the obvious choice to succeed Willie Ormond as Scotland manager in May 1977.

At first he enjoyed great success as Scotland won the British International Championship in 1977 by drawing 0-0 away with Wales, beating Northern Ireland 3-0 at Hampden then winning 2-1 against England at Wembley – a match covered in greater detail here

A South American tour brought victory over Chile (in a game which many think should never have been played as the venue had been used as a centre for torture and murder by the Pinochet regime less than four years previously), a draw in Argentina and defeat in Brazil. After a friendly defeat against East Germany, MacLeod led Scotland to a successful conclusion of the World Cup qualifying campaign with wins over European Champions Czechoslovakia at Hampden and Wales at Anfield. A poor home international series in 1978 (two draws and a defeat despite all three games being played at Hampden) should have led to some apprehension about the forthcoming World Cup but by this time much of Scotland had been caught up in hysteria surrounding our chances in Argentina. MacLeod was as guilty – but no more so than others IMHO – as anyone in ramping up the expectations as the team were waved off by a crowd of over 20,000 at Hampden even though there was no game to play.

The 1978 World Cup campaign is well enough documented elsewhere. Suffice to say it destroyed MacLeod’s reputation as an international manager. After a 3-2 defeat in Austria at the start of the next round of European Championship qualifiers he and the SFA parted company. In just under 17 months and 17 games in charge his record was P17 W7 D5 L5 F26 A21 Certainly he relied to a great extent on players introduced by Willie Ormond and in his time in charge only gave international debuts to eight players and three of these – Jim Stewart, David Stewart & Jim Blyth – were goalkeepers. Other players who owed their international starts to Ally were Arthur Graham, Stuart Kennedy, Ian Wallace, Derek Johnstone & John Robertson. Captains during his time as national manager were Bruce Rioch (10), Martin Buchan (1), Don Masson (2), and Archie Gemmill (4).

Ally returned to Ayr United who had just been relegated to the First Division. But after less than three months he seized the chance to manager in the Premier Division with struggling Motherwell. He was unable to turn them round and Motherwell finished bottom of the Premier Division in 1978-79. After two unsuccessful seasons trying to win promotion MacLeod left Motherwell where David Hay succeeded him.

MacLeod was out of management until taking over at First Division Airdrieonians in 1984. Results were average and in November 1985 he embarked upon his third spell as Ayr boss. The Honest Men were struggling to avoid relegation to the Second Division. Ally was unable to repeat the magic of his first period at Somerset Park and Ayr were relegated at the end of the season.

Promotion looked on the cards in 1986-87 but in an echo of his playing days at Blackburn, MacLeod’s side lost at home to promotion rivals Stirling Albion in their final game of the season when a draw would have been enough to take them up. He was more successful in his second season as Ayr won the title, scoring 95 league goals in the process. But life back in the First Division was again a struggle and Ayr finished 11th of 14 in 1988-89. They finished 10th in 1989-90 and a return to the Premier was as far away as ever in 1990-91 when Ayr decided Ally’s contract would not be renewed at the end of the season. That was in December 1990 and MacLeod decided to go straight away rather than hang around until the summer.

There then followed his last fling in management with Queen of the South, then near the foot of the Second Division. Ally failed to revive them though his enthusiasm for the game was as strong as ever, playing and scoring (from a penalty) in a reserve game at the age of 61. He departed Palmerston Park in 1992.

It’s a statistical oddity that a man as famous and with such a long managerial career as Ally MacLeod only spent one full season (1976-77) managing the same club in the Premier Division (though he had managed both Ayr and Aberdeen the season before).

Sadly, Ally MacLeod was yet another footballer to suffer from Alzheimer’s Disease though he was able to attend Ayr United’s first ever major Cup Final when they played and lost to Rangers in the League Cup in 2002.

That was his last appearance at a major match and he died shortly before what would have been his 73rd birthday, on February 1st 2004. It was a mark of the respect in which he was held in the game that former team-mates like Dave Whelan & Ronnie Clayton as well as the likes of Alex McLeish & Alex Ferguson were among the many mourners at his funeral.

It is an indication of changing times that should any Scotland manager achieve what resulted in MacLeod’s vilification (failure to make the quarter-finals of the World Cup on goal difference) he would be lionised as even more of a Messiah than Ally ever was back in the heady days of 1978.

Scotsman obituary

Wikipedia entry

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Re: Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by Steve Bell » Thu Feb 16, 2012 3:54 pm

Perhaps someone can help out here. Bedford were responsible for one of the biggest FA Cup shocks ever when they beat 2nd Division Newcastle United 2-1 in the third round at St James Park in January 1964. They also reached the fourth round in 1966 beating Hereford in the third round. Before that Hereford had knocked out 2nd Division Millwall. If Wallace played in any of these games it would establish a pre-Berwick giant-killing pedigree.
Jock Wallace was in goal for Bedford Town when they beat Newcastle United in January 1964. He did not play in the 1965/66 Hereford cup matches, the goalkeeper then being Peter Isaac.

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Re: Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by Scottish » Thu Feb 16, 2012 5:17 pm

The claim re Hereford refers to the 1966-67 FA Cup, not 1965-66. Hereford's official site confirms HERE that Wallace played in all three national tournaments that season. Text (two-thirds down the page) reads: "An additional record was set during this campaign that may never be bettered. Hereford's goalkeeper, Jock Wallace, left the club to become player/manager of Berwick Rangers, and played for them in their historic Scottish Cup triumph over Glasgow Rangers. His Scottish Cup appearance was added to those already made for Hereford in both the English and Welsh FA Cups, making him the only man to play in all three competitions in the same season"

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Re: Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by Steve Bell » Fri Feb 17, 2012 11:22 am

A query on cup giant-killing has turned into playing in three separate cup competitions in the same season. Two different things.

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Re: Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by Scottish » Fri Feb 17, 2012 12:02 pm

Steve Bell wrote:A query on cup giant-killing has turned into playing in three separate cup competitions in the same season. Two different things.
Yes, and my own original query at that. Apologies. All I can say in mitigation is that the original query was five years ago and I got it mixed up. Sorry and thanks for the info.

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Re: Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by Steve Bell » Fri Feb 17, 2012 12:20 pm

No problem.

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Re: Jock Wallace & Ally McLeod's career

Post by the hibLOG » Sun Feb 19, 2012 10:22 pm

Do you mean this photo?

Image

He's not wearing a cardigan, he's wearing a poodle.
Fraser

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