Foreign Football Books

The place to recommend books to other Forum users. Or even to warn off.
killiegradge
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Foreign Football Books

Post by killiegradge » Wed Mar 31, 2010 10:34 pm

Just found this site via Killiefc.com!

As a Killie fan I tend not to read books on Scottish football unless they relate to Killie or a few about Scotland.
Consequently I have taken to reading books on football overseas.
I can recomend the following and hope you guys can add to the list.
A Season With Verona-Tim Parks
Miracle of Castel di Sangro-Mcguiness
Morbo-Phill Ball
More Than just a Game-Chuck Corr
Black and Blue-Paul Cannoville
Outcasts United-Warren St John
A Different Corner-Brentnall
Comrade Jim-=Jim Riordan
Football Dynamo-Marc Bennetts
Football & Fascism-Martin
The Father of Italian Football-Garbutt
Ajax The Dutch & The War- Simon Kuper
Calcio-John Foot
Once Upon a Time in Naples-ludden
Parma Notes from Serie A-Burke

Can anyone suggest any others? I am sure I have missed many in there as the books mentioned relate mainly to the last 5 years or so.

Scottish
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Post by Scottish » Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:05 pm

Hi there and welcome to the forum.

I would strongly recommend anything in this particular forum that's a sticky :wink:

prorege
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Post by prorege » Thu Apr 01, 2010 7:24 am

Although not 100% about football, these two have strong football content, and are very entertaining:

Playing the Moldovans at Tennis (Tony Hawks)
Author attempts to track down every member of the Moldovan national football team in order to play a game of tennis against each of them

Stamping Grounds (Charles Connelly)
A book about football in Liechtenstein

Three more 'conventional' books that are worth reading are:

Tor (Ulrich Hesse-Lichtenburger)
English-language book on thehistory of German football

Brilliant Orange (David Winner)
Dutch football

Football Against The Enemy (Simon Kuper)
Chapters on different football rivalries worldwide

killiegradge
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Post by killiegradge » Thu Apr 01, 2010 8:23 pm

Thanks guys for the tips.
Of course I have all Davids Killie books (as an advanced subscriber!) and will order the rest over the weekend.
Football in Spain is very interesting and I will be in Spain next weekend for the Madrid Half Marathon. My Madrid based friends intend to take me to see Rayo Vallecano v Las Palmas although I woulod like to see the other "minor" game taking place in Madrid that weekend-Real Madrid v Barcelona. So if you have any contacts who can get me a couple of tickets at a reasonable price then let me know!?

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Post by Scottish » Fri Apr 02, 2010 12:56 am

Last time I asked about 'El Gran Clasico' tickets I was told there were plenty available - provided I had a spare 1,500€ lying around.

killiegradge
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Post by killiegradge » Fri Apr 02, 2010 9:29 am

scottish wrote:Last time I asked about 'El Gran Clasico' tickets I was told there were plenty available - provided I had a spare 1,500€ lying around.
Yes I did find some at the bargain price of €870 PER TICKET.

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Post by Scottish » Fri Apr 02, 2010 2:52 pm

Whatever happens you'll have better luck than me. The only time I spent a weekend in Madrid it was also international weekend and Spain were playing in Seville.

msdkfc
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Post by msdkfc » Sun Apr 04, 2010 12:53 am

Football dynamo by Marc Bennetts is part guide to Russian football, part travel guide and part autobiography of the author's life in Russia. It's an enjoyable read and contains some eye opening tales concerning the corruption and racism there.

I'm reading Tor! The Story of German football at the moment, have to say it's fascinating, but then i would say that as i'm a keen follower of the Bundesliga and frequent visitor to games there. Particularly good are the accounts of the 'Miracle of Berne' in 1954, the rivalry between Bayern Munich and Borussia Monchengladbach throughout the 70s, and the bungs scandal of 1971.

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Post by Scottish » Sun Apr 04, 2010 1:25 am

msdkfc wrote:. Particularly good are the accounts of the 'Miracle of Berne' in 1954
Mention of that brings to mind an excellent book though technically speaking it isn't 'foreign.'

'Soccer Revolution' by Willy Meisl is a pocket history of the game with a particular emphasis on tactical developments in the first half of the 20th century (it was originally published in 1955). Unlike much of the parochial stuff prevalent at the time Meisl covers the development of football in Europe, particularly central Europe where he is at his most knowledgeable. His brother Hugo Meisl was the coach of the great inter-war Austrian national team.

Willy Meisl himself was a prominent sports journalist in Germany in the 1920s and early 1930s before emigrating to the UK in 1934 (Meisl was Jewish) and taking out British nationality.

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Post by msdkfc » Mon Apr 05, 2010 1:35 pm

Sorry to go off on a tangent, but i was just wondering David how much Spanish you knew before you moved to Barcelona. Had you ever studied it before, say at school/college/university, or on your own? You'd have no doubt picked up a lot from your visits there and from friends i guess.

How have you found it since you moved? Are you now fluent?

And how big a part does Catalan play, have you had to learn any?

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Post by Scottish » Mon Apr 05, 2010 6:23 pm

msdkfc wrote:Sorry to go off on a tangent, but i was just wondering David how much Spanish you knew before you moved to Barcelona.
Un pocito. John Meffen is this site's resident expert Spanish speaker.
msdkfc wrote:Had you ever studied it before, say at school/college/university, or on your own? You'd have no doubt picked up a lot from your visits there and from friends i guess.
I started learning French at the age of seven as this grimy pic from the Kilmarnock Standard of 1964 shows but packed it in as soon as I could. The only languages available in secondary school in those days were French and Latin (which I also packed in as soon as I could). Needless to say these were decisions I later regretted. The only Spanish I did was one hour a week at Penwith College in Penzance in 2001-02.

Image
msdkfc wrote:How have you found it since you moved? Are you now fluent?
I get by but I am nowhere near fluent. My reading is better than my speaking and my speaking is better than my listening. There are two major problems - one is the willingness of people to be 'helpful' by speaking English as much as possible and the second is that mine is by definition a solitary occupation. I am not working alongside Spanish speakers every day and thus am cut off from everyday conversation except when in shops, cafes, bars, restaurants etc.

OTOH we do not mix in expat circles. Not because we want to avoid native English speakers but we think there's a danger that life becomes an English speaking club on the Med. We know one person who has been living in Spain for six years but speaks as little Spanish as the day he arrived.
msdkfc wrote:And how big a part does Catalan play, have you had to learn any?
On the written page it looks like a mix of Spanish and French. Spoken it sounds like neither. All official publications and notices are in Catalan but usually with a Spanish translation. Not always though. Today we were in the Parc del Laberint where all the signs were in Catalan only. Catalans don't really expect foreigners to know their language and are happy to converse in Spanish or English. I find learning one language hard enough without trying to learn two at the same time. Inevitably though one or two phrases get picked up and as a matter of common courtesy it's simple enough to express please and thank you in the local lingo no matter where in the world you are. Like everywhere else locals are happy if you make the effort to get those small courtesies right.

Of course unless someone speaks Catalan to me there is no way of knowing if they know the language or not as I would estimate at least 30% of the population (in the city not the province) are non-Catalan or of non-Catalan parentage.

killiegradge
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Post by killiegradge » Mon Apr 05, 2010 6:46 pm

Sorry if Ive missed it but as a newbie here I probably have.
Are you living in Spain now David? Close to Barcelona I presume?

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Post by Scottish » Mon Apr 05, 2010 9:38 pm

You have a PM

John Meffen

Post by John Meffen » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:42 am

scottish wrote:Un pocito. John Meffen is this site's resident expert Spanish speaker.
Ahem - Poquito

John Meffen

Post by John Meffen » Tue Apr 06, 2010 9:44 am

And I would never call myself an expert in anything except the obscurantia of Falkirk FC 1877-1902 [the non-league years]

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